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Dick Lohuis
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Post by Dick Lohuis »

41 sqn XV494 at Leck on 31 August 1974.

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Dick
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dinovandoorn
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Post by dinovandoorn »

Superbase Holloman in1993... ( F-4, F-106, F-100, F-84, AT-38, F-15, F-117 ).

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Dino
Dick Lohuis
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Post by Dick Lohuis »

6 sqn XV408/L at Söllingen on 14 July 1971.
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Dick Lohuis
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MiG killer

Post by S&B extra »

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In October 1966, strike force F-105 Thunderchiefs were equipped with QRC-160 radar jamming pods whose effectiveness virtually ended their losses to surface-to-air missiles. As a result, SAM attacks shifted to the Phantoms, unprotected because of a shortage of pods. To protect the F-4s, rules of engagement that allowed the MiGCAP to escort the strike force in and out of the target area were revised in December to restrict MiGCAP penetration to the edge of SAM coverage. MiG interceptions increased as a result, primarily by MiG-21s using high speed hit-and-run tactics against bomb-laden F-105 formations, and although only two bombers had been lost, the threat to the force was perceived as serious.[45]

The Bolo plan reasoned that by equipping F-4s with jamming pods, using the call signs and communications codewords of the F-105 wings, and flying their flight profiles through northwest Vietnam, the F-4s could effectively simulate an F-105 bombing mission and entice the MiG-21s into intercepting not bomb-laden Thunderchiefs, but Phantoms configured for air-to-air combat.[46]

After an intensive planning, maintenance, and briefing period, the mission was scheduled for January 1, 1967. Poor weather caused a 24-hour delay, but even then, a solid overcast covered the North Vietnamese airbases at Phuc Yen, Gia Lam, Kep, and Cat Bai when the bogus strike force began arriving over the target area, five minute intervals separating the flights of F-4s. Leading the first flight, Olds overflew the primary MiG-21 base at Phuc Yen and was on a second pass when MiGs finally began popping up through the cloud base. Although at first seemingly random in nature, it quickly became apparent that the MiGs were ground-controlled intercepts designed to place the supposed F-105s in a vise between enemies to their front and rear.[46]

The F-4s and their crews, however, proved equal to the situation and claimed seven MiG-21s destroyed, almost half of the 16 then in service with the VPAF (the VPAF admitted to losing six that day), without loss to USAF aircraft. Olds himself shot down one of the seven. Follow-up interceptions over the next two days by MiGs against RF-4C reconnaissance aircraft led to a similar mission on a smaller scale on January 6, with another two MiG-21s shot down. VPAF fighter activity diminished to almost nothing for 10 weeks afterwards, thereby accomplishing the main goal of Operation Bolo: to eliminate or diminish the threat of MiGs to the strike formations.[46]
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P.Terlouw
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Post by P.Terlouw »

F-4E of the 57th FIS at the 1985 RIAT at RAF Fairford.

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kiwi
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Re: MiG killer

Post by kiwi »

@ S&B extra:

Nice! Thanks for the story, really enjoyed reading it!
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dinovandoorn
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Post by dinovandoorn »

i don't know the whole story about this mig-killer, but it is always nice to see an F-4 with some history...

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Dino
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Slijfie
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Post by Slijfie »

This very nice story was sent to me by a former Missouri ANG pilot (Matthew Riehl) who saw a photo of 'his' F-4C at Airliners.net. First the photo (that was published here before I think).

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I was stationed with the St. Louis Air National Guard years ago and the aircraft in your photo (64-0838) was assigned to the unit at the time. I kind of considered 838 to be mine, as I had a memorable flight in it.

While there at the St. Louis airport I used to watch the F-15s from the McDonnell Douglas factory depart the aerodrome using what they called the "Viking Departure". This departure was a takeoff, a pull to the pure vertical, and a VFR climb out of the top of the TCA. Well, being a (young and dumb) Lieutenant I always thought that it would be cool to do a Viking departure in my beloved Phantom. Of course being encumbered by wing tanks, pylons, TERs, and AIM-9 rails that was never going to happen.

Then one cold and cloudy December day in 1984 I was given the privilege of flying 838 to McConnell AFB for it's heavy maintenance check. I was told that the aircraft would be, other that the bare inboard pylons, be completely clean. I figured that if there was ever going to be a chance to do a Viking Departure in a Rhino, that was going to be it. It was about 20°F outside (plenty of nice thick air) and there was an overcast layer at 9,000 ft AGL (which turned out to be a Godsend).

As I got my flight clearance I asked for a Viking Departure (did I mention that I was a young and dumb Lieutenant at the time?). I had told no one of my plans because I didn't want to be told not to try it. Well, Clearance Delivery told me that the Viking Departure was a special arrangement between the Airport and McDonnell Douglas and wasn't available to other aircraft, at which point my heart sunk. But the they said that I could have an unrestricted climb to 10,000 ft. Good enough for me! We (I had a crew chief in the back seat) taxied out to the short crossing runway for takeoff. When cleared for takeoff I ran the engines up as much as possible prior to break release. After brake release and full AB it took only 2,000 ft to get airborne. I sucked up the gear, left the flaps down (leading edge BLC is a wonderful thing), and accelerated to 250 knots - which took another 2,000 ft or so. This put me about in mid-field. At that point we pulled up smartly to 80° nose high for the climbout. I was proud of the old girl that day, she gave me her best. I remember looking into the outside mirrors and seeing the whole airfield laid out behind me. With the clean configuration and the dense cold air we made the clouds still at 80° nose high - barely. As we punched into the clouds I remember seeing an indicated airspeed of about 120 knots. That's not a great airspeed to be at in a hard wing Rhino. But the combination of hanging on the burners and the extended flaps with the BLC saved the day. This was the only true time I ever did slow flight in an aircraft. I very gingerly nosed the aircraft over as the airspeed started to climb. The only thing running through my mine was "don't depart and fall back down out of the clouds, don't depart and fall back down out of the clouds". Luckily we didn't. The speed slowly built back up to a safe, normal airspeed and we continued on our way. I don't think the crew chief even knew what we had just done (it was his first flight).

Well, no one ever claimed that Lieutenants were exceptionally smart. But I had my "Viking Departure" and a memory that'll last me a lifetime. Interestingly, I notice in your photo that the aircraft shows a MiG kill on it's intake. We never knew that at St. Louis and it was never marked as such.

The kill was earned on 2 January 1967 when the F-4 downed a MiG-21
Dick Lohuis
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Post by Dick Lohuis »

A couple older Japanese from my collection:

57-6910 of 501 Hikotai on 13 December 1977.
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47-8328 of 303 Hikotai at Komatsu in October 1981.
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87-8407 of 306 Hikotai at Komatsu on 23 July 1982.
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Dick
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dinovandoorn
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Post by dinovandoorn »

dinovandoorn wrote:i don't know the whole story about this mig-killer, but it is always nice to see an F-4 with some history...

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Dino

I did some research and found this about the mig kills on this F-4C...


On April 23rd 1967,Maj. Robert D. Anderson and Capt. Fred D. Kjer downed a MiG-21 using an AIM-7 Sparrow missile near Hanoi. On May 22nd 1967 Lt.Col. Robert F. Titus with 1Lt. Milan Zimer as his "GIB" ad led "Wander" flight on a MiGCAP for an F-105 strike against Ha Dong barracks and a supply depot in Hanoi and downed two MiG-21s,one with AIM-9 Sidewinder missile and the second with 20mm fire from the centerline SUU-16 gun pod.


Dino
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maurits
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Post by maurits »

Hi guys,

Amazing old shots, especially the Japanese ones!

Found an older 1993 slide from F-4G, 69-0263/SP operating with 81TFS.
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also an old BDRT F-4C 63-7576 from former Michigan ANG was catched during the Bitburg open day May 1993.
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regards,

Maurits
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Basman
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Post by Basman »

Time to bump the Phantom topic up again. Just a couple of pics taken during TLP 2008-3.

An F-4 giving way to his younger family member:
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Regards,

Bas
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Post by Dollar99 »

Louisiana ANG F-4Cs at Nellis in 1983

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MyOneOFour
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Post by MyOneOFour »

The 3 "specials" of the Hopsten Open Day 2001

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Last edited by MyOneOFour on 23 Nov 2008, 10:47, edited 1 time in total.
Visit my website at: www.On-Finals.nl
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DJMikey
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Post by DJMikey »

Here you go with 2 preserved ones in the Museum del Aero, Cuatro Vientos, Spain. Pics taken on 18th of Octobre:

RF4C
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F4C
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Grt, Mike.
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